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Clery Act Handbook


The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Prepared for:

U.S. Department of Education

Office of Postsecondary Education

By:

Westat

Diane Ward

Janice Lee Mann

This report was prepared in part under Contract Nos. ED-04-CO-0059/0004 and ED-99-CO-0109 with Westat and ED-IES-10-C-0016 with INOVAS. Mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Michelle Coon served as the contracting officer’s representative. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the positions or policies of the U.S. Department of Education. No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise mentioned in this publication is intended or should be inferred.

U.S. Department of Education

Arne Duncan

Secretary

Office of Postsecondary Education

Eduardo Ochoa

Assistant Secretary

Policy Coordination, Development and Accreditation Service

 

David Bergeron

Senior Director

February 2011

This report is in the public domain. Authorization to reproduce it in whole or in part is granted. While permission to reprint this publication is not necessary, the citation should be: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education,

The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting, Washington, D.C., 2011.

This report is available on the Department’s website at:

http://www.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/campus.html.

On request, this publication is available in alternate forms, such as Braille, large print or computer diskette. For more information, please contact the Department’s Alternate Format Center at 202-260-0852 or 202-260-0818.

Photo credits

Cover: Upper and lower left, Westat; center, Shutterstock; upper and lower right, Getty Images; page 100, Westat. The republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use of these photos independent of

The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting is prohibited. The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting iii

CONTENTS

Abbreviations ................................................................................................................. vi

Figures.......................................................................................................................... vii

Tables ............................................................................................................................. ix

Foreword ........................................................................................................................ xi

Acknowledgments.......................................................................................................... xiii

1. Introduction: An Overview of Campus Safety and Security Reporting .............. 1

Purpose of the Handbook .................................................................................... 3

Getting Additional Help ...................................................................................... 9

2. Geography: Location, Location, Location .......................................................... 11

How to Identify Your On-campus Geography .................................................... 12

How to Identify Your Public Property ................................................................ 18

How to Identify Your Noncampus Buildings or Property .................................. 25

Use of Maps......................................................................................................... 31

3. Crime Statistics: Classifying and Counting

Clery Act Crimes ............................ 33

Crime Definitions ................................................................................................ 34

Types of Criminal Offenses ................................................................................ 35

Arrests and Disciplinary Referrals for Violation of Weapons, Drug and Liquor Laws ........................................................................................................ 64

4. Collecting Statistics: Campus Security Authorities and Law Enforcement Agencies ........................................................................................ 73

How to Identify Your Institution’s CSAs ........................................................... 74

What Does a Campus Security Authority Do? ................................................... 76

What Shouldn’t a Campus Security Authority Do? ............................................ 77

Exemption for Pastoral and Professional Counselors ......................................... 77

Requesting Statistics From Local Law Enforcement Agencies ......................... 82

5. The Daily Crime Log: Recording Crimes Reported to Campus Police or Security Personnel ............................................................................................... 89

Purpose of the Daily Crime Log.......................................................................... 90

Creating Your Log............................................................................................... 92

Required Crime Log Elements ............................................................................ 92

Maintaining Your Log ......................................................................................... 94

Making Your Log Available ............................................................................... 95

iv The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

6. Emergency Notification and Timely Warnings: Alerting Your Campus Community .......................................................................................................... 97

Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures .............................................. 97

The Timely Warning ........................................................................................... 111

Emergency Notification and Timely Warnings: Sorting Out the Differences .......................................................................................................... 118

7. Policy Statements: Disclosing What You Do and How You Do It ..................... 119

Categories of Campus Security Policies That Must Be Addressed in the Annual Security Report ....................................................................................... 120

8. Policy Statements: Sex Offenses and Offenders ................................................. 141

Sex Offense Policy, Procedures and Programs ................................................... 141

Advising the Campus Community About Sex Offenders ................................... 146

9. The Annual Security Report: Publishing Policy Statements and Crime Statistics ............................................................................................................... 149

Presenting Your Policy Statements in the Annual Security Report .................... 150

Presenting General Crime Statistics and Arrest and Disciplinary Referral Statistics ................................................................................................ 150

Presenting Hate Crime Statistics in the Annual Security Report ........................ 153

10. Missing Students: The Twenty-four Hour Rule .................................................. 161

Policy Statement .................................................................................................. 162

Procedures ........................................................................................................... 165

11. Fire Safety Disclosures: Requirements and Definition of a Fire ......................... 171

Definition of a Fire .............................................................................................. 171

12. The Fire Log: Recording Fires in On-campus Student Housing Facilities .............................................................................................................. 175

What Are Reported Fires? ................................................................................... 175

Creating a Fire Log.............................................................................................. 176

Reporting to the Campus Community ................................................................. 179

13. Fire Statistics: Classifying and Counting Fires in On-campus Student Housing Facilities ................................................................................................ 181

Required Fire Statistics ....................................................................................... 181

14. The Annual Fire Safety Report: Publishing Policy Statements and Fire Statistics ............................................................................................................... 189

Components of the Fire Safety Report ................................................................ 190

The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting v

Appendices

A

Higher Education Act of 1965 Safety- and Security-related Laws and Regulations ............................................................................ 199

A-1.

Federal Register, Nov. 1, 1999 (Vol. 64, No. 210), Student Assistance General Provisions; Final Rule. 34 CFR 668.41, Reporting and Disclosure of Information 34 CFR 668.46, Institutional Security Policies and Crime Statistics .......................................................................... 201

A-2.

Federal Register, Oct. 31, 2002 (Vol. 67, No. 211), Student Assistance General Provisions; Final Rule. 34 CFR 668.46, Institutional Security Policies and Crime Statistics .......................................................................... 219

A-3.

Federal Register, Oct. 29, 2009 (Vol. 74, No. 208), General and Non-Loan Programmatic Issues; Final Rule. 34 CFR 668.41, Reporting and Disclosure of Information 34 CFR 668.46, Institutional Security Policies and Crime Statistics 34 CFR 668.49, Institutional Fire Safety Policies and Fire Statistics ..................................................................................... 223

A-4.

Higher Education Opportunity Act, Aug. 14, 2008. Program Participation Agreement Requirements ...................... 243

B Sample Letters and Forms for Collecting Crime Reports and Requesting Crime Statistics ................................................................... 245

B-1. Sample Letter to Campus Security Authorities Regarding the Federal

Clery Act ................................................ 247

B-2. Sample Campus Security Authority Crime Report Form .......... 249

B-3. Sample Campus Security Authority Sex Offenses Report Form ............................................................................... 251

B-4. Sample Letter to a Local Law Enforcement Agency to Request Crime Statistics ............................................................ 252

C Sample Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) .................................. 255

D

Higher Education Act of 1965, Sec. 120 (as amended by the Higher Education Opportunity Act, Sec. 107) ................................. 263

E Checklist for Campus Safety and Security Compliance ........................ 267

Index .......................................................................................................................... 279

vi The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

ABBREVIATIONS

AD: Athletics director

Clery Act: Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act

CSA: Campus Security Authority

DUI: Driving under the influence

DWI: Driving while intoxicated

ED: U.S. Department of Education

HEA: Higher Education Act of 1965

HEOA: Higher Education Opportunity Act

FERPA: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

FBI: Federal Bureau of Investigation

FSEOGs: Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants

GO: General order

LEAP: Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership

MOA: Memorandum of Agreement

MOU: Memorandum of Understanding

NIBRS: Uniform Crime Reporting National Incident-Based Reporting System

PPA: Program Participation Agreement

RA: Resident assistant

SOP: Standard operating procedure

UCR: Uniform Crime Reporting

 

The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

vii

FIGURES

1. Example of public property: sidewalk, street, sidewalk .............................. 20

2. Example of public property: parking lot ...................................................... 21

3. Example of public property: gated fence ..................................................... 24

4. Example of noncampus: mixed-use apartment building .............................. 30

5. Categories of hate crime offenses ................................................................ 56

6. CSA Training Suggestions ........................................................................... 81

7. Sample Daily Crime Log With Required Elements ..................................... 92

8. Example of Emergency Notification via Text Message .............................. 100

9. Sample Announcement for Student E-Mail Sign-up for Emergency Notification .................................................................................................. 101

10. Sample Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures Statement...................................................................................................... 104

11. Sample Procedures for Testing Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures ................................................................................. 108

12-A. Sample Timely Warning .............................................................................. 115

12-B. Sample Timely Warning .............................................................................. 116

12-C. Sample Timely Warning .............................................................................. 117

13. Sample Scenarios Regarding Emergency Notification and the Timely Warning ........................................................................................... 118

14. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Issuing Timely Warnings ................ 121

15. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Preparation of Disclosure of Crime Statistics ............................................................................................ 122

16. Sample Policy Statement Addressing How to Report Criminal Offenses ....................................................................................................... 123

17. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Voluntary Confidential Reporting...................................................................................................... 124

18. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Limited Voluntary Confidential Reporting................................................................................. 124

19. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Security and Access ......................... 125

20. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Campus Law Enforcement Authority (For Institutions Whose Police Have Arrest Authority) .............. 126

21. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Campus Law Enforcement Authority (For Institutions Whose Police Do Not Have Arrest Authority) ..................................................................................................... 127

22. Sample Statement Addressing the Working Relationship with Local Law Enforcement for an Institution That Has an MOU .................... 128

23. Sample Statement Addressing the Working Relationship with Local Law Enforcement for an Institution That Does Not Have an MOU ............................................................................................................ 129

24. Sample Policy Statement Addressing the Encouragement of Accurate and Prompt Crime Reporting........................................................ 129

viii The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

25. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Counselors and Confidential Crime Reporting (For Institutions With Confidential Reporting Procedures) .................................................................................................. 131

27. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Security Awareness Programs for Students and Employees ........................................................ 132

26. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Counselors and Confidential Crime Reporting (For Institutions Without Confidential Reporting Procedures) .................................................................................................. 131

28. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Crime Prevention Programs for Students and Employees......................................................................... 133

29. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Criminal Activity Off Campus (For Institutions Whose Police Monitor Off-campus Activity) ....................................................................................................... 134

30. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Criminal Activity Off Campus (For Institutions Whose Police Do Not Monitor Off-campus Activity) .......................................................................................... 135

31. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Alcoholic Beverages ........................ 135

32. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Illegal Drug Possession ................... 136

33. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Substance Abuse Education ............ 137

34. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Disclosures to Alleged Victims of Crimes of Violence or Non-forcible Sex Offenses .................... 138

35. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Preventing and Responding to Sex Offenses ............................................................................................ 145

36. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Sex Offender Registration (For Institutions Maintaining a List of Registered Sex Offenders On-Site) ........................................................................................................ 147

37. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Sex Offender Registration (For Institutions Providing an Electronic Link to Registered Sex Offender Information Maintained by an Outside Law Enforcement Agency) ........................................................................................................ 148

38. Sample Crime Statistics Reporting Table .................................................... 152

39. Examples of Descriptive Hate Crime Reporting ......................................... 153

40. Sample Notice of Annual Security Report Availability .............................. 155

41. Sample Notice of Combined Annual Security Report and Annual Fire Safety Report Availability .................................................................... 156

42. Sample Statement Addressing Missing Student Notification Policy and Procedures ............................................................................................. 168

43. Sample Missing Student Contact Registration Form ................................... 169

44. Sample Reported Fire Scenarios .................................................................. 176

45. Sample Fire Log With Required Elements .................................................. 178

46. Classifications of Fire and Examples ........................................................... 182

47. Value Ranges for Estimated Property Damage Due to Fire ........................ 185

48. Sample Fire Statistics Reporting Table for the Annual Fire Safety Report ........................................................................................................... 187

49. Sample Description of On-campus Student Housing Facility Fire Safety Systems ............................................................................................. 192

The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting ix

50. Sample Policy Statement Addressing Policies or Rules on Portable Electric Appliances, Smoking and Open Flames in a Student Housing Facility ........................................................................................... 193

51. Sample Statement Addressing Procedures for Student Housing Evacuation in the Case of a Fire .................................................................. 194

52. Sample Statement Addressing Fire Safety Education and Training Programs Provided to Students and Employees .......................................... 195

53. Sample List of the Titles of Each Person or Organization to Whom Students and Employees Should Report That a Fire Occurred .................... 196

54. Sample Plans Addressing Future Improvements in Fire Safety .................. 196

TABLES

1. Components of

Higher Education Act compliance regarding campus safety and security reporting: Basic requirements and time frames ........................................................................................................... 8

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The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

xi

Foreword

I

n 2005 we published The Handbook for Campus Crime Reporting, a compendium of U.S. Department of Education (ED) guidance on complying with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). Since that time, the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) was signed into law, amending the Clery Act and adding a number of safety- and security-related requirements to the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA).This new legislation necessitated writing The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting—an updated and expanded version of the previous handbook.

This new version of the handbook will familiarize you with the amended

Clery Act and the new regulations that were added by HEOA. Similar to the 2005 version, this handbook takes you step by step along the path to compliance and explains what the regulations mean and what they require of your institution. It also includes new examples and enhanced explanations of many topics based on questions asked of our Campus Safety and Security Help Desk (see inside back cover for e-mail address) over the past several years.

What hasn’t changed is the handbook’s emphasis on compliance as a whole system of developing policy statements, gathering information from a variety of sources and translating it into the appropriate categories, issuing alerts, disseminating information, and, finally, keeping records. Although we address "you" throughout, we want to stress that this is not a one-person job. As you will see when you read further, a key ingredient in ensuring compliance is coordination—knowing who does what and when. This means that most of you will find it necessary to coordinate compliance activities with many people and offices in the campus community.

We hope that you will use this handbook not only to comply fully with the law and its regulations, but to make sure that your disclosures to students, employees, families and the public are easily understandable and useful. So, please read the handbook carefully, think about how the requirements apply to your situation and then review the handbook again. Remember: the goal of the safety- and security-related

HEA regulations is to provide students and their families, as higher education consumers, with accurate, complete and timely information about safety on campus so that they can make informed decisions.

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The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

xiii

Acknowledgments

T

This handbook would be less than complete without the contributions of the many institutions who gave us permission to use their policy statements and reporting forms as samples to illustrate compliance. Our thanks goes to the following:

• Bacone College

• California State University, Fresno

• California State University, Long Beach

• California State University, Los Angeles

• Cayuga Community College

• Dodge City Community College

• George Washington University

• Hollins University

• James Madison University

• Johns Hopkins University

• McDaniel College

• Montgomery College, Maryland

• San Diego State University

• Strayer University

• Tufts University

• University of California, Irvine

• University of California, San Diego

• University of California System

• University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

• University of Tennessee, Chattanooga

• University of Wyoming

• Vanderbilt University

• Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

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The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

1

Introduction:

An Overview of Campus Safety And Security Reporting

Chapter 1

Choosing a postsecondary institution is a major decision for students and their families. Along with academic, financial and geographic considerations, the issue of campus safety is a vital concern. In 1990, Congress enacted the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990 (Title II of Public Law 101-542), which amended the Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA). This act required all postsecondary institutions participating in HEA’s Title IV student financial assistance programs to disclose campus crime statistics and security information. The act was amended in 1992, 1998 and 2000. The 1998 amendments renamed the law the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act in memory of a student who was slain in her dorm room in 1986. It is generally referred to as the Clery Act.

On Aug. 14, 2008, the

Higher Education Opportunity Act or HEOA (Public Law 110-315) reauthorized and expanded the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended. HEOA amended the Clery Act and created additional safety- and security-related requirements for institutions. Specifically, it added:

• New categories to the list of hate crimes all institutions must disclose (Clery amendment);

A new disclosure regarding the relationship of campus security personnel with state and local law enforcement agencies (Clery amendment);

Implementation and disclosure of emergency notification and evacuation procedures for all institutions (Clery amendment);

Implementation and disclosure of missing student notification procedures for institutions with on-campus student housing facilities (HEOA);

Fire safety reporting requirements for institutions with on-campus student housing facilities (HEOA);

Chapter 1. Introduction: An Overview of Campus Safety and Security Reporting

 

 

2 The Handbook for Campus Safety and Sec urity Reporting

Text clarifying the definition of an on-campus student housing facility (Clery and HEOA); and

A Program Participation Agreement (PPA) requirement concerning disclosure of the results of disciplinary proceedings to the alleged victim of any crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense (HEOA).

Although

HEA, as amended, is the law that governs the administration of all federal higher education programs, as used in this handbook, HEA refers only to the Clery Act and HEOA safety- and security-related requirements.

How to determine if your institution must comply with

 

HEA

Does your institution participate in federal Title IV student financial assistance programs? All public and private postsecondary institutions that participate in Title IV must comply with

HEA. Title IV institutions have signed Program Participation Agreements (PPAs) with the U.S. Department of Education (ED) to administer these financial assistance programs. They include: Pell Grants; Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs); the Federal Work-Study Program; Federal Perkins Loans; the Direct Loan Program; and the Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (LEAP). If you are not sure whether your institution participates in Title IV, contact your institution’s financial aid officer or chief executive officer. Note that:

Your institution must comply with HEA requirements beginning on the date your Program Participation Agreement goes into effect (i.e., the date it is signed by the secretary of education). If you have questions about when your PPA went into effect, contact our School Eligibility Channel’s School Participation Team for your region.

If your institution is Title IV eligible, but has a location or locations that serve students who are not receiving Title IV student aid, you must still comply with HEA requirements for all locations. The requirement is based on institutional eligibility, not location eligibility.

Although

 

 

HEA, as amended, is the law that governs the administration of all federal higher education programs, as used in this handbook, HEA refers only to the Clery Act and HEOA safety- and security-related requirements.

Chapter 1. Introduction: An Overview of Campus Safety and Security Reporting The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting 3

If your institution primarily serves secondary students, but enrolls even one postsecondary student, you must comply.

If your institution is not a Title IV institution or has a "deferment only" status (i.e., it does not provide student loans or grants through Title IV programs but does have students who are eligible to defer federal student loans while they are enrolled in your school), you are not required to comply with HEA requirements described in this handbook.

Title IV institutions that are exempt from compliance:

 

If your institution is a distance education-only school, you do not have to comply providing students are never present on a physical campus. This means that students do not go to a physical location to enroll, seek guidance, study, work, intern, etc. The exception to this rule is the annual graduation ceremony. For this event only, if students attend the ceremony at a location that your institution owns or controls, your institution is still exempt from compliance.

Foreign institutions are exempt from the requirements; however, foreign campuses of U.S. institutions are not exempt and must comply with HEA requirements.

If you have determined that your institution

 

is a Title IV institution and must comply, read on.

Purpose of the Handbook

This handbook contains current ED guidance and was written to assist you, in a step-by-step and readable manner, in understanding and meeting the various

HEA requirements. It is intended for use by postsecondary institutions as well as our program reviewers who are responsible for evaluating an institution’s compliance with the requirements. This is to ensure that everyone involved in complying with the law and in monitoring compliance is "on the same page."

The handbook will not change the current regulations in any way. It does not supplant or replace

HEA, and HEA and its regulations take precedence if there are any differences Chapter 1. Introduction: An Overview of Campus Safety and Security Reporting 4 The Handbook for Campus Safety and Sec urity Reporting

between them and the handbook. Your institution is responsible for ensuring that it complies with any changes to

HEA and the regulations.

Handbook Organization

Chapter 2 assists you in

laying the proper foundation for HEA safety- and security-related reporting by explaining the important role geography has in compliance with the law and its regulations. We discuss in detail how to identify which buildings and property owned or controlled by your institution fall into the various HEA-related geographic categories. Getting this foundation right is key to knowing:

What crimes and fires to report and in which reporting categories to disclose them;

From whom to collect crime and fire reports;

Whether a campus alert must be issued;

Whether a crime or a fire report must be entered into a log;

What policy statements your institution must have on record; and

What annual reports your institution must publish.

Subsequent chapters describe and discuss the various requirements by topic. We suggest reading the chapters in order because some chapters contain information that builds upon previous topics. For example, Chapter 3 discusses how to count and classify the crimes that occur on your

HEA geography for inclusion in your statistical disclosures. Chapter 4 helps you determine from whom within your institution and from which local law enforcement agencies you must obtain such crime information. There are also cross-references throughout the handbook for the times you just want to research a particular regulation or issue.

The handbook also contains citations for the applicable legislation, highlights important information in side notes, provides examples of crime and fire scenarios, suggests helpful practices and provides sample documents to assist you in determining if your policies and procedures are compliant. There are a number of appendices at the back of the handbook which are referenced throughout the chapters, along with an index to help you locate specific terms and topics. And,

We suggest reading the chapters in order because some chapters contain information that builds upon previous topics. Chapter 1. Introduction: An Overview of Campus Safety and Security Reporting The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting 5

because no handbook could cover every situation, help desk contact information is provided if you need further assistance.

The Requirements

The law contains specific requirements, but allows a great deal of flexibility in complying with them. This flexibility acknowledges the myriad differences in types, locations and configurations of postsecondary schools. Although

all institutions have immediate, ongoing and annual requirements, compliance might differ in some respects from one institution to another. For example, compliance for an institution with on-campus student housing facilities will differ in some respects from compliance for a small commuter school located in a strip mall. A single institution might have some different compliance requirements for each of its campuses. In any case, whatever the requirements are for your specific institution, they must be met completely and on time.

The requirements fall into three categories based on the configuration of an institution: (1) Clery crime statistics and security-related policy requirements that must be met by every institution; (2) an additional Clery crime log requirement for institutions that have a campus police or security department; and (3)

HEOA missing student notification and fire safety requirements for institutions that have at least one on-campus student housing facility. Following is a list of the requirements by category along with the number of the applicable handbook chapter or chapters.

1. Every institution must:

 

 

Collect, classify and count crime reports and crime statistics.

The regulatory requirements for classifying and counting crimes are discussed in Chapter 3. The regulatory requirements for collecting crime reports and statistics are discussed in Chapter 4.

Issue campus alerts. To provide the campus community with information necessary to make informed decisions about their health and safety, you must: Issue a timely warning for any Clery Act crime that represents an ongoing threat to the safety of students or employees;

 

All institutions have immediate, ongoing and annual requirements.

 

 

 

Chapter 1. Introduction: An Overview of Campus Safety and Security Reporting 6 The Handbook for Campus Safety and Sec urity Reporting

 

Issue an emergency notification upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurring on the campus.

The regulatory requirements regarding these topics are discussed in detail in Chapter 6.

Publish an annual security report containing safety- and security-related policy statements and crime statistics and distribute it to all current students and employees. Schools also must inform prospective students and employees about the availability of the report.

The regulatory requirements regarding crime statistics are discussed in Chapter 3 and the regulatory requirements for the annual security report are discussed in Chapters 7–9.

Submit crime statistics to ED. Each year in the fall you must participate in a Web-based data collection to disclose crime statistics by type, location and year.

The regulatory requirements for the data collection are discussed in Chapter 9. The comprehensive user’s guide for the survey is located online at:

https://surveys.ope.ed.gov/security.

2.

 

 

In addition to the requirements for all institutions listed under no. 1, if your institution maintains a campus police or security department, you must keep a daily crime log of alleged criminal incidents that is open to public inspection.

The regulatory requirements regarding the daily crime log are discussed in Chapter 5.

3.

 

 

In addition to the requirements for all institutions listed under no. 1, if your institution has any on-campus student housing facilities, you must: Disclose missing student notification procedures that pertain to students residing in those facilities.

Chapter 1. Introduction: An Overview of Campus Safety and Security Reporting

 

The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

7

Disclose fire safety information related to those facilities. You must: Keep a fire log that is open to public inspection.

 

Publish an annual fire safety report containing policy statements as well as fire statistics associated with each on-campus student housing facility, including number of fires, cause, injuries, deaths and property damage. Schools also must inform prospective students and employees about the availability of the report.

 

Submit fire statistics to ED each fall in the Web-based data collection.

 

 

The regulatory requirements regarding missing student notification are discussed in Chapter 10 and the regulatory requirements regarding fire safety are discussed in Chapters 11–14.

Compliance Timetable

Compliance with

HEA is not a once-a-year event. Many requirements must be satisfied before an institution can be considered in full compliance. Some requirements are ongoing, such as crime information collecting, campus alerts and log updating, while other requirements are less frequent, such as the annual reports and the online survey you submit to ED.

Table 1 is an overview of the basic requirements and time frames for the main components of compliance. (Note that Appendix E provides a detailed checklist for compliance.)

Compliance with HEA is not a once-a-year event. Chapter 1. Introduction: An Overview of Campus Safety and Security Reporting 8 The Handbook for Campus Safety and Sec urity Reporting

Table 1. Components of

 

Higher Education Act compliance regarding campus safety and security reporting: Basic requirements and time frames What to Do

 

When to Do It

 

 

 

Have emergency notification and evacuation procedures

 

 

for alerting the campus community about significant emergencies or dangerous situations. Disclose your policies and procedures in the annual security report.

Use emergency notification procedures whenever there is an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees on campus.

 

Issue timely warnings

 

 

to alert the campus community about crimes that pose a serious or continuing threat to safety. Disclose your policy in the annual security report.

Issue a warning whenever there is a threat that a crime is ongoing or may be repeated.

 

Keep a crime log

 

 

that records, by date reported, all crimes reported to the campus police or security department.a

Update your log within two business days of the crime report. Make the log available to the public during business hours.

 

Keep a fire log

 

 

that records by date reported, all fires in on-campus student housing facilities.b

Update your log within two business days of the fire report. Make the log available to the public during business hours.

 

Collect crime reports from campus security authorities

 

 

within the institution.

Identify campus security authorities at the beginning of the calendar year and collect crime reports on an ongoing basis.

 

Request crime statistics from local law enforcement

 

 

in the jurisdiction where the institution is located.

Make a request annually, ideally at the beginning of the calendar year.

 

Submit crime and fire statistics to ED

 

 

via a Web-based data collection.b

Submit statistics each fall, by the dates provided by ED in a letter to your institution sent each year in July.

 

Have missing student notification procedures

 

 

to aid in determining if a student is missing and in notifying law enforcement personnel. Disclose your policy and procedures in the annual security report.b

Follow required procedures whenever a student is determined to have been missing for 24 hours. Offer students the opportunity to register a contact annually.

 

Publish an annual security report

 

 

containing campus security policy disclosures and crime statistics for the previous three years.

Publish and distribute your report or provide a notice of its availability annually by Oct. 1.

 

Publish an annual fire safety report

containing policy disclosures and fire statistics for on-campus student housing facilities for the previous three years.

b

Publish and distribute your report or provide a notice of its availability annually by Oct. 1.

 

About This Policy
Last Updated
8/31/2015
Original Issue Date
8/31/2015

Responsible Department
Public Safety